« 2016 »

Tue Jan 12, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

 For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Tue Jan 19, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Thu Jan 21, 2016

GLOBES Fellows Social

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Location: 298 Galvin Hall

Meet your peers in the GLOBES Certificate in Environment & Society and join in the "speed friending" activity to learn about each other's research interests. 5-6:30 p.m. in Rm 298 Galvin.

RSVP

Reilly Dual Degree Program Info Session

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Location: 258 Fitzpatrick

The  Reilly Program is a dual degree program which allows ND Engineering students to complete any combination of one Engineering degree and one Arts & Letters degree over five years. 

If earning an Arts and Letters degree (in addition to your Engineering degree) is of interest to you, please come to a short informational session.  We will provide an overview of the program as well as the opportunity to answer any questions you might have.…

Fri Jan 22, 2016

HPS Brownbag-Stapleford

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Location: 109 Pasquerilla Center

“Science as a Communal Practice: Practice Theory, Virtue Ethics, and the Study of Science”

Thomas Stapleford

 

 

In this talk, I'll present a chapter from my current book project that draws on joint work with ND alum Dan Hicks. The chapter uses both practice theory and the virtue ethics of Alasdair MacIntyre to construct an explicitly ethical, analytic framework for studying science. I will develop this framework in some detail and discuss how it fits within the book project, an effort to improve democratic control over government statistics without subverting the political function of those statistics.…

Tue Jan 26, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Tue Feb 2, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Mon Feb 8, 2016

Reilly Forum - Flint Water Crisis

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Location: 107 Pasquerilla Hall

Clean Water Access, Poverty, & Environmental Health in Urban America A Reilly Center Forum

 

The Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values invites you to join us for a conversation on the impacts of race and poverty on American's environmental health and clean water access. Expert panelists in sustainable water technology, environmental law, and public health policy will lead this discussion which will explore the current water crisis in Flint, and beyond.

Panelists:

  • Kevin Doudrick, PhD, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Laboratory of Advanced and Sustainable Water Treatment
  • Bruce Huber, PhD, Notre Dame Law School, Reilly Center Fellow
  • Jessica Nickrand, Reilly Center

Moderated by Jessica Baron, PhD, Reilly Center

Tue Feb 9, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Fri Feb 12, 2016

HPS Brownbag- Anjan Chakravartty

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Location: 109 Pasquerilla Center

“Antidotes to Scientific Perspectivism”

 

Is science irreducibly perspectival? Kantian views of scientific knowledge (which take it to be irreducibly reflective of human ways of knowing) and thoroughly conventionalist views (which see all aspects of it in terms of human conventions) are obvious forms of perspectivism. Recently some scientific realists, who hold that we have at least some substantive knowledge of a mind-independent world (unlike Kantians and thoroughgoing conventionalists), have also argued that scientific knowledge is inescapably perspectival. The commonplace use in science of incompatible models of one and the same phenomenon is invoked as exemplary. Can we make sense of this combination of perspectivism and realism, and does the realist need to? The correct answers to these questions are 'no', and 'no', respectively. I'll explore some options for what a realist could say instead.…

Tue Feb 16, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Wed Feb 17, 2016

Coogan Lecture - Alice Dreger "Galileo's Middle Finger"

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Location: Carey Auditorium in the Hesburgh Library

Alice Dreger

This talk draws from the speaker’s book, Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science, and explores the ways in which freedom of research is under assault from multiple fronts, including identity politics activism, the corporatization and branding of universities, and social media shaming campaigns. The speaker, who has twenty years’ experience both as an intersex patient rights activist and as an academic historian, will use case studies to talk about the dangers researchers face today. She will also speak to how researchers can work individually and collectively to try to protect themselves. She argues they must do so not for their own sake, but for the sake of social progress in our fragile democracy.

Tue Feb 23, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Tue Mar 1, 2016

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 242 O'Shaughnessy Hall

For our reading group this semester we will be reading James Bryant Conant’s unpublished 1952 philosophy of science lectures, given just before he left the Harvard presidency.…

Thu Mar 31, 2016

David Leary

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Location: TBA

The Reilly Center Program in History and Philosophy of Science, The Notre Dame Department of Psychology, and the Program of Liberal Studies presents:

 

“What’s Schopenhauer Got to Do with It? New Revelations about William James’s Life and Work”

 

Though he was one of the prominent thinkers of the mid-to-late nineteenth century, and made a difference at one point or another in the lives of such diverse twentieth-century figures as Albert Einstein, Max Horkheimer, Karl Popper, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, the work of the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) fell into general neglect during the past hundred years.  In recent decades, however, there has been renewed interest in his work, and in recent few years discoveries have been made (by the speaker) about the previously unknown influence of that work upon William James (1842-1910).  This presentation will review some of these discoveries and the new light they cast upon key incidents in James’s personal life as well as significant aspects of his professional work, including its literary style, moral tone, and substantive doctrines.…

Tue Apr 5, 2016

HPS Colloquium-Richard Oosterhoff

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Location: 207 DeBartolo

The Wits of Idiots: Lay Knowledge of Nature in the Northern Renaissance

Before 'common sense' became a name for the untutored mind in the eighteenth century, renaissance intellectuals tempered their erudition by drawing on the 'idiota' as the source of immediate experience of God and nature. The 'idiota' became a central figure in late medieval devotional writing. Meanwhile, intellectuals picked up the 'idiota' as an example of immediate, self-taught knowledge, both to present a vision of wisdom outside traditional disciplines, and to ground natural knowledge in experience. This lecture will explore the theme of the 'idiota' in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries as a paradigm of immediate natural knowledge.…

Tue Apr 19, 2016

Robert Pennock

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Location: 207 DeBartolo

Upcoming lecture by Robert Pennock, a philosopher of science at Michigan State University, about "The Curious Character of the Scientist" on Tuesday, April 19th at 4:15 PM in 207 DeBartolo. Pennock will be presenting preliminary results from the Scientific Virtues Project, a national survey of leading scientists that examines the values they see as being central to exemplary scientific work.…

Wed Apr 20, 2016

Philosophy of Physics Workshop

Location: 400 Geddes Hall

University of Notre Dame Philosophy of Physics Workshop

April 20th-21st, 2016
400 Geddes Hall

12:00-1:00 Lunchtime brown bag talk: 

1:15-2:00 Jeremy Steeger: Sheaves, generalized probability, and the hierarchy of quantum contextuality Kapustin’s rigidity theorem for quantum 

3:00-3:45 Pablo Ruiz de Olano: Intimate connections: symmetries and conservation laws in quantum versus Black hole complementarity and the information loss paradox…

Thu Apr 21, 2016

Philosophy of Physics Workshop

Location: 400 Geddes Hall

University of Notre Dame Philosophy of Physics Workshop

April 20th-21st, 2016
400 Geddes Hall

12:00-1:00 Lunchtime brown bag talk: Bryan Roberts: Unreal Observables

1:15-2:00 Jeremy Steeger: Sheaves, generalized probability, and the hierarchy of quantum contextuality Kapustin’s rigidity theorem for quantum …

Eleanor Knox- Cushing Prize Lecturer

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Location: 207 DeBartolo

 Spacetime Functionalism

Abstract: Many (perhaps all) concepts in science are functional, but the idea that we should conceive of spacetime as whatever fills some functional role has not been much explored. Nonetheless, a functional conception of spacetime seems to be required by some theories of quantum gravity in which spacetime is non-fundamental. I'll argue that functionalism is also helpful in the context of classical spacetime theories; it has the potential to dissolve some old problems. I'll look at possible consequences of spacetime functionalism for the debate between the substantivalist and the relationist, and for various debates over the 'right' space in which to set a given theory.…

Fri Apr 22, 2016

NDIAS Workshop

Location:

NDIAS workshop: The relationship of body and mind in late antique philosophy and theology…

Mon Apr 25, 2016

HPS Talk co-sponsored with NDIAS-Peter Harrison

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Location: 155 DeBartolo

“Religious Origins of Modern Science?

It is often thought that modern science developed largely independently of, or even in opposition to, religion.  Some historians, however, have suggested that religious factors played an important role in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and in giving science a central place in Western culture.  This lecture explores a number of ways in which religion might have had a positive impact on the emergence of modern science and in the establishment of its social and intellectual legitimacy. …

Tue Apr 26, 2016

Thu Apr 28, 2016

Fri Sep 23, 2016

Fri Sep 30, 2016

AWIS-ND Women in Science Conference

Location: Jordan Hall of Science and Hilton Garden Inn/Inn at St. Mary's 

The Reilly Center is please to cosponsor the inaugural AWIS conference at Notre Dame.

With an increase of graduating PhD students and a declining academic job market, current PhD students face a more challenging process of locating a position within their field. Women especially have a hard time expanding their career in STEM. The Association for Women in Science, Notre Dame Chapter’s (AWIS-ND) vison in hosting the first ever RegionalWomen in Science conference is to provide the career development and networking opportunitiesfor female graduate students to succeed.…

Sat Oct 1, 2016

AWIS-ND Women in Science Conference

Location: Jordan Hall of Science and Hilton Garden Inn/Inn at St. Mary's 

The Reilly Center is please to cosponsor the inaugural AWIS conference at Notre Dame.

With an increase of graduating PhD students and a declining academic job market, current PhD students face a more challenging process of locating a position within their field. Women especially have a hard time expanding their career in STEM. The Association for Women in Science, Notre Dame Chapter’s (AWIS-ND) vison in hosting the first ever RegionalWomen in Science conference is to provide the career development and networking opportunitiesfor female graduate students to succeed.…

Sun Oct 2, 2016

Mon Oct 3, 2016

Keynote Address - Dorothy Roberts: “Gender, Race, and Dangerous Mothers in the Old and New Bioscience”

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Location: McKenna Hall Auditorium

Keynote Address of the 6th meeting of the Association for Feminist Epistemologies, Methodologies, Metaphysics, and Science Studies (FEMMSS)

“Gender, Race, and Dangerous Mothers in the Old and New Bioscience”

Dorothy Roberts
George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology
Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights
University of Pennsylvania