« October 2015 »

Fri Oct 2, 2015

Reilly Faculty Fellows Lunch

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Location: 109 Pasquerilla

For faculty fellows of the ND Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values.

Join us for a welcome back lunch (provided) and brief reserch presentation by Phil Sloan (PLS, emeritus):

Title: “Metaphors of Life: An Inquiry Into the Mastery of Nature”

Description:  I will discuss my ongoing book project into the

Mon Oct 5, 2015

Barbara Walker

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Location: 118 DeBartolo Hall

Sponsored by the Notre Dame Dept of History.

Barbara Walker, "A War of Experts: Soviet and American Knowledge in Cold War Competition and Collaboration."

This talk, by Prof. Barbara Walker (University of Nevada, Reno) is about Cold War competition between Soviets and Americans in three different areas of expertise pertaining to the discovery and analysis of information: computing, scholarship, and journalism. Its specific focus is on the “informal discourses,” in the form of professional gossip, story-telling and myth-making, that were channeled by professional networks in these areas on either side. It explores the impact that these discourses had on the progress and outcome of the Cold War, arguing that in transnational expert encounters, they could turn competition into collaboration and vice versa.…

Tue Oct 6, 2015

Gwyneth Cravens: novelist, journalist - "Can Nuclear Energy Save the World?"

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Location: Washington Hall

gwyneth_cravens

The Reilly Center and ND Energy will host Gwyneth Cravens, American novelist and journalist, on October 6th. Ms. Cravens is best known for her writings on nuclear power as a safe and reliable alternative energy source and one that is an essential preventive of global warming. She is the author of “Terrorism and Nuclear Energy: Understanding the Risks” (published in 2002) and most recently “Power to Save the World: The Truth about Nuclear Energy” (published in 2007). She has contributed numerous articles and given countless talks on nuclear energy, emphasizing the need for environmental and technical communities to work together to reduce the anthropogenic causes of catastrophic climate change. We hope you will share our enthusiasm and spread the word throughout your departments and to your students for what we anticipate to be a lively and productive discussion.…

HPS Reading Group

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Location: HPS Reading Group

The HPS Reading group will cover Joyce Chaplin's, "Technology, the Body, and Science on the Anglo-American Frontier, 1500-1676" during the Fall 2015 Semester.…

Thu Oct 8, 2015

Reilly Undergraduate Seminar - Guests from the Center for Bionic Medicine

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Location: 114 Pasquerilla

Max Shepherd and Eric Earley from the Chicago Rehabilitation Institute’s Center for Bionic Medicine will join us for a conversation and demonstrations.
 
Max and Eric will speak about their experiences as engineers working with physicians, ethicists, software developers, and therapists to develop artificial limbs that can be controlled by the patient’s brain.…

Tue Oct 13, 2015

HPS Reading Group

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Location: HPS Reading Group

The HPS Reading group will cover Joyce Chaplin's, "Technology, the Body, and Science on the Anglo-American Frontier, 1500-1676" during the Fall 2015 Semester.…

Tue Oct 27, 2015

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 118 O'Shaughnessy Hall

Final meeting of the fall semester.  Next semester's topic will be determined. …

Thu Oct 29, 2015

HPS Colloquium Speaker: Joyce Chaplin

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Location: 112 Pasquerilla

 “Adam, Eve, and Early America: Population Theories before Thomas Robert Malthus”

Joyce Chaplin
James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History, Harvard University

Even as “Malthusianism” is today thought of overwhelmingly in relation to the developing, extra-European world, Malthus’s Essay on the Principle of Population_ (first published in 1798) has been overwhelmingly explicated within a European if not British context. But it was the new world, not the old, which fundamentally shaped Malthus’s central claim,that population always existed within natural limits. New world land and new world peoples, both native and colonial, and whether assumed to be Edenic or else Satanic, would be the key examples for Malthus’s thesis about population, life, and death, which drew on several earlier centuries of theorization about these problems.