« March 2014 »

Thu Mar 13, 2014

Conference plenary: "What Darwin Didn't Change: Enduring Interactions of Faith, Science, and Reason"

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Location: McKenna Hall Conference Center

Plenary Presentation by Rev. Dr. Emilie Townes

 

Dean, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of Womanist Ethics and Society
Vanderbilt University Divinity School

Reception to follow. 

A detailed schedule can be found on the conference website:  www.whatdarwindidntchange.com

Fri Mar 14, 2014

Conference - "What Darwin Didn't Change: Enduring Interactions of Faith, Science, and Reason"

Location: McKenna Hall Conference Center

A detailed schedule can be found on the conference website:  www.whatdarwindidntchange.com

 

Registration: Registration is FREE (through the conference website) and includes breakfast and lunch on Friday, March 14th.  The conference is open to any students, faculty, staff, or other affiliated individuals who would like to attend. Although the conference is free, please register before hand.

Thu Mar 20, 2014

Ethics Café - Communities and Complexities: The Ethics of Community-Based Research

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Location: Geddes Coffee House

Engaging in research projects with community partners introduces unique and challenging ethical tensions. Such tensions may develop around issues of power, control, confidentiality, mutuality, and transparency. Special considerations emerge as well for community-based researchers as they seek institutional review board approval of their projects.

HPS Colloquium - Sandra Harding. “After Mr. Nowhere: New Proper Scientific Selfs”

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Location: 216 DeBartolo

Sandra Harding

Sandra Harding, Distinguished Professor of Education and Gender Studies, UCLA

For close to five decades the anti-authoritarian social movements have criticized the idea that only value-free scientific research can count as objective.  What is the new "proper scientific self" that is supposed to replace this "Mr. Nowhere" who supposedly in principle can see everywhere in the world from no particular place in it? …

Thu Mar 27, 2014

HPS Colloquium - Mary Jo Nye. “Mine, Thine, and Ours: Patterns of Collaboration and Co-Authorship in Science”

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Location: 216 DeBartolo

Mary Jo Nye

Mary Jo Nye, Professor of History Emerita, Oregon State University

Patterns of collaboration and co-authorship in chemistry from the 1920s to the 1960s are examined with an eye to the allocation of credit during a period of expanding group authorship and team research in science. Three research leaders are the focus of this study within a framework of sociological literature on collaborative patterns among eminent scientists. It is argued that Michael Polanyi in Berlin, Linus Pauling in Pasadena, and Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin in Oxford—all of whom used techniques and instruments of X-ray diffraction—are cases that confirm the need to de-center historical narrative from “he” or “she” to the collaborative “they.” Yet crucially, too, these cases demonstrate the significance of the local and the personal for historical explanation that transcends generalizations about scientific practice, material culture, and sociological trends.…