« 2013 »

Sun Apr 7, 2013

Midwest Junto Conference

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Location: McKenna Hall

Midwest Junto for the History of science

The Midwest Junto for the History of Science and the University of Notre Dame invite students, faculty, and independent scholars to the 56th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Junto, to be held on the campus of the University of Notre Dame, from Friday, 5 April to Sunday, 7 April 2013. The Midwest Junto retains its founders’ vision that it should be informal and congenial.

Click here for the Junto webpage and here for a pdf version of the program. 

Please direct any questions about the Notre Dame conference to junto13@nd.edu.

For questions about the Junto more generally, please contact Junto secretary Peter Ramberg ramberg@truman.edu.

Click here for the complete call for papers.

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Mon Apr 8, 2013

Tue Apr 9, 2013

Wed Apr 10, 2013

Thu Apr 11, 2013

2013 Cushing Prize Lecture. Charlotte Werndl - "What are New Implications of Chaos for Unpredictability?"

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Location: 320 DeBartolo Hall

Charlotte Werndl will give the Cushing Prize Lecture 2013. Dr. Werndl is lecturer at the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, at the London School of Economics. Previously she was a Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, at Queen's College, University of Oxford.

Click here for more information on the Cushing Prize.

Tue Apr 16, 2013

Tom Broman

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Location: 131 Decio

Tom Broman will be holding a brownbag discussion on his paper,  "The Semblance of Transparency: Expertise as a Social Good and an Ideology in Enlightened Societies," Osiris 27 (2012), 188-208.…

Fri May 3, 2013

HPS Spring Workshop

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Location: 131 Decio

History and Philosophy of Science Workshop
Spring 2013
 
Opening talk 12:30– 1:30 (Brown bag lunch)
Erik Peterson (University of Alabama, HPS alumnus)  “When Did the Influence of the Environment on Evolution Become Heretical (Again)?”
1:30 Coffee Break
1:50 Dan Hicks (post-doc),  “The Two Dimensional Values Gap in the GMOf Controversy”

Brown-bag Lunch with Erik Peterson (University of Alabama, HPS alumnus)

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Location: 131 Decio

Join us for a brown-bag lunch talk with Erik Peterson, HPS alumnus, now at University of Alabama. His talk is titled:  “When Did the Influence of the Environment on Evolution Become Heretical (Again)?”

This event is part of a larger HPS Spring Workshop. For more details, see here: http://reilly.nd.edu/news-and-events/events/2013/05/03/16721-hps-workshop/
 

Fri May 10, 2013

Tue May 14, 2013

Brown Bag talk with Andrew Warwick

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Location: 131 Decio Hall

 

Andrew Warwick Artemesia

Andy Warwick will discuss his new project at a brown bag at noon on May 14th. Please e-mail baron.17@nd.edu for the readings if you plan to attend. His project ‘History … Fiction?’engages a broad public on issues of mid-Victorian science, technology and medicine through the medium of an historical thriller.

Artemisia

Charles Murray’s first adventure

What if?  In the early 1970s Chinese scientists found and developed the anti-malarial power of Artemisia to protect soldiers in the Vietnam War.  But suppose British explorers in China had discovered the plant and its properties more than a century earlier?  Artemisia tells that story through the eyes of Charles Murray, a troubled young scientist struggling to make a living in mid-Victorian London.

 

Thu Jun 6, 2013

Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science

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Location: 210-214 McKenna Hall (Notre Dame Conference Center)

Click here for the conference website.

Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science

The motivation for this conference stems from the conviction that recent philosophical scholarship on the range of cognitive attitudes available to scientists and the differences between them (consider, e.g., believing, accepting, entertaining, conjecturing, supposing, etc.) could prove valuable for enriching the literature on values and science. For example, disputes over the proper roles for non-epistemic values in responding to situations of underdetermination might be clarified by analyzing the range of cognitive attitudes available to scientists in such situations (e.g., belief vs. acceptance) and the sorts of values that are relevant when adopting particular attitudes. The literature on values in science might also be strengthened by reflecting on the cognitive attitudes that scientists adopt toward simplified models or toward technoscientific artifacts and the sorts of epistemic, ethical, and pragmatic values that promote the aims associated with those attitudes. Related questions concern the cognitive attitudes that scientists adopt when they propound claims as voices of authority in policy contexts and the sorts of values that become relevant to their work as a result.

Fri Jun 7, 2013

Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science

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Location: 210-214 McKenna Hall (Notre Dame Conference Center)

Click here for the conference website.

Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science

The motivation for this conference stems from the conviction that recent philosophical scholarship on the range of cognitive attitudes available to scientists and the differences between them (consider, e.g., believing, accepting, entertaining, conjecturing, supposing, etc.) could prove valuable for enriching the literature on values and science. For example, disputes over the proper roles for non-epistemic values in responding to situations of underdetermination might be clarified by analyzing the range of cognitive attitudes available to scientists in such situations (e.g., belief vs. acceptance) and the sorts of values that are relevant when adopting particular attitudes. The literature on values in science might also be strengthened by reflecting on the cognitive attitudes that scientists adopt toward simplified models or toward technoscientific artifacts and the sorts of epistemic, ethical, and pragmatic values that promote the aims associated with those attitudes. Related questions concern the cognitive attitudes that scientists adopt when they propound claims as voices of authority in policy contexts and the sorts of values that become relevant to their work as a result.

Wed Jun 12, 2013

Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop

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Location: Digital Visualization Theater, Jordan Hall of Science

Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge across and within Cultures

Click here for the conference website.

Astrolabe

It is a well recognized phenomenon that astronomical ideas, theories, and data have historically crossed cultural and disciplinary boundaries. For the Eleventh Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, we invite submissions that explore the theme of diffusion of astronomical knowledge. We understand “diffusion” to be a broad category: How did astronomical theories pass from on culture to another? What ideas expressed in one language or worldview were modified when passing into another system? How do subcultures within a single broader culture, such as professional and amateur within the same geographical region, interact? How do new discoveries make their way through a scientific community, and how do they eventually get rejected or accepted? How does knowledge pass from specialists to the broader popular culture? How do instruments play a role in transferring and shaping knowledge, especially as they pass between cultures? As in previous years, we expect that the theme can encompass a number of different time periods and geographical locations. Proposals that directly address the theme will receive preferential treatment.

Thu Jun 13, 2013

Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop

Location: McKenna Hall

Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge across and within Cultures

Click here for the conference website.

Astrolabe

It is a well recognized phenomenon that astronomical ideas, theories, and data have historically crossed cultural and disciplinary boundaries. For the Eleventh Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, we invite submissions that explore the theme of diffusion of astronomical knowledge. We understand “diffusion” to be a broad category: How did astronomical theories pass from on culture to another? What ideas expressed in one language or worldview were modified when passing into another system? How do subcultures within a single broader culture, such as professional and amateur within the same geographical region, interact? How do new discoveries make their way through a scientific community, and how do they eventually get rejected or accepted? How does knowledge pass from specialists to the broader popular culture? How do instruments play a role in transferring and shaping knowledge, especially as they pass between cultures? As in previous years, we expect that the theme can encompass a number of different time periods and geographical locations. Proposals that directly address the theme will receive preferential treatment.

Fri Jun 14, 2013

Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop

Location: Adler Planetarium, Chicago

Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge across and within Cultures

Click here for the conference website.

Astrolabe

It is a well recognized phenomenon that astronomical ideas, theories, and data have historically crossed cultural and disciplinary boundaries. For the Eleventh Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, we invite submissions that explore the theme of diffusion of astronomical knowledge. We understand “diffusion” to be a broad category: How did astronomical theories pass from on culture to another? What ideas expressed in one language or worldview were modified when passing into another system? How do subcultures within a single broader culture, such as professional and amateur within the same geographical region, interact? How do new discoveries make their way through a scientific community, and how do they eventually get rejected or accepted? How does knowledge pass from specialists to the broader popular culture? How do instruments play a role in transferring and shaping knowledge, especially as they pass between cultures? As in previous years, we expect that the theme can encompass a number of different time periods and geographical locations. Proposals that directly address the theme will receive preferential treatment.

Sat Jun 15, 2013

Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop

Location: McKenna Hall

Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge across and within Cultures

Click here for the conference website.

Astrolabe

It is a well recognized phenomenon that astronomical ideas, theories, and data have historically crossed cultural and disciplinary boundaries. For the Eleventh Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, we invite submissions that explore the theme of diffusion of astronomical knowledge. We understand “diffusion” to be a broad category: How did astronomical theories pass from on culture to another? What ideas expressed in one language or worldview were modified when passing into another system? How do subcultures within a single broader culture, such as professional and amateur within the same geographical region, interact? How do new discoveries make their way through a scientific community, and how do they eventually get rejected or accepted? How does knowledge pass from specialists to the broader popular culture? How do instruments play a role in transferring and shaping knowledge, especially as they pass between cultures? As in previous years, we expect that the theme can encompass a number of different time periods and geographical locations. Proposals that directly address the theme will receive preferential treatment.

Sun Jun 16, 2013

Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop

Location: McKenna Hall

Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge across and within Cultures

Click here for the conference website.

Astrolabe

It is a well recognized phenomenon that astronomical ideas, theories, and data have historically crossed cultural and disciplinary boundaries. For the Eleventh Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, we invite submissions that explore the theme of diffusion of astronomical knowledge. We understand “diffusion” to be a broad category: How did astronomical theories pass from on culture to another? What ideas expressed in one language or worldview were modified when passing into another system? How do subcultures within a single broader culture, such as professional and amateur within the same geographical region, interact? How do new discoveries make their way through a scientific community, and how do they eventually get rejected or accepted? How does knowledge pass from specialists to the broader popular culture? How do instruments play a role in transferring and shaping knowledge, especially as they pass between cultures? As in previous years, we expect that the theme can encompass a number of different time periods and geographical locations. Proposals that directly address the theme will receive preferential treatment.

 

Wed Jul 31, 2013

Scientific Ethics

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Location: Nieuwland Science Hall 118

David Goodstein poster

Dr. David L. Goodstein, Ph.D. will present on scientific ethics. He is professor emeritus of physics and applied physics at the California Institute of Technology, where he worked for over 40 years. From 1988 to 2007, he was also Vice-Provost of Caltech. His research concentrates on experimental condensed matter physics, a discipline that Physics Today

Tue Aug 27, 2013

HPS Reading Group

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

Introductory and organizational meeting.

If you are not already registered to access the reading via the Hesburgh Library e-reserves system, please contact Moiz Hasan at mhasan@nd.edu

Tue Sep 3, 2013

Mon Sep 9, 2013

TEDTalking: Biohacking - you can do it, too

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Location: 400 Geddes Hall

Ellen Jorgensen: Biohacking -- you can do it, too
We have personal computing, why not personal biotech? That's the question biologist Ellen Jorgensen and her colleagues asked themselves before opening Genspace, a nonprofit DIYbio lab in Brooklyn devoted to citizen science, where amateurs can go and tinker with biotechnology.…

Thu Sep 12, 2013

Mon Sep 16, 2013

TEDTalking: The Internet could crash. We need a Plan B

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Location: 400 Geddes Hall

Danny Hillis: The Internet could crash. We need a Plan B
In the 1970s and 1980s, a generous spirit suffused the Internet, whose users were few and far between. But today, the net is ubiquitous, connecting billions of people, machines and essential pieces of infrastructure -- leaving us vulnerable to cyber-attack or meltdown. Internet pioneer Danny Hillis argues that the Internet wasn't designed for this kind of scale, and sounds a clarion call for us to develop a Plan B: a parallel system to fall back on if and when…..…

Tue Sep 17, 2013

Wed Sep 18, 2013

Ethics Cafe - Copyright: What are your rights and obligations?

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Location: O'Shaughnessy Hall 201

Copyright: What are your rights and obligations?Ethics Cafe, fall 2013, copyright

Tim Flanagan, an attorney in Notre Dame’s Office of General CounselAre you concerned about your rights to your own published work? Are you unsure what constitutes fair use? Bring your questions and concerns about copyright issues to this Ethics Café to hear various perspectives about your rights to your work and when using the work of others. The panelists are…

Fri Sep 20, 2013

HPS Brown Bag Talk. Grant Ramsey and Michael Deem - "Guilt by association?"

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Location: 131 Decio Hall

Abstract:
Guilt presents us with an evolutionary puzzle. Unlike some basic emotions—fear or surprise, say—that have clear individual-level adaptive functions, guilt is more enigmatic. While it may be good for you that others are guilt prone, and good for the group as a whole, is guilt also good for the individual? In this paper, we provide an evolutionary perspective on the nature of guilt and whether it is an individual-level or group selected trait. We begin by surveying philosophical and psychological analyses of guilt, noting their parallels and problems, before arriving at a clear conception of guilt. We then examine its role in contemporary legal contexts, which provide clues to its original function. Finally, we provide the outlines of two evolutionary explanations for guilt. We argue that group selection probably promoted the capacity to experience guilt, but that there may have been a positive individual selection force as well.…

Mon Sep 23, 2013

Tue Sep 24, 2013

Wed Sep 25, 2013

Writing Successful Grants

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Location: De Bartolo 141

Writing Successful Grants

For those who are new to the art of grantwriting, this introductory workshop will cover basic principles of good grant writing, starting with the articulation of a compelling research theme and including the construction of the proposal itself. Major differences between traditional ”academic prose” and persuasive grant writing will be highlighted. Common pitfalls that can lead to early rejection of good ideas will be reviewed, as well as practical strategies for better writing. Special attention will be paid to the perspectives of grant reviewers and how to write in ways that will meet their expectations.