The History and Philosophy of Science Ph.D. Program at Notre Dame is fortunate to have an active and diverse community of scholars who come together to make our doctoral program vibrant and successful.

Please feel free to explore the pages of our faculty or click here for recent faculty news and announcements

Katherine Brading
Katherine Brading
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of physics and philosophy of science, including symmetries, structuralism, space-time theory, and seventeenth-century cosmology

Matthew Ashley
James Matthew Ashley
Associate Professor & Department Chair of Theology
Areas of Expertise: Science and Religion; Liberation Theology

Francesca Bordogna
Francesca Bordogna
Associate Professor, Program of Liberal Studies
Areas of Expertise: Histories of science, technology, and the mind

Anjan Chakravartty
Anjan Chakravartty
Professor of Philosophy
Director, Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of science; Metaphysics

Jon Coleman
Jon T. Coleman
Professor of History
Areas of Expertise: Environmental history; Human and animal relations; Early American history; American West

Michael Crowe
Michael J. Crowe
Rev. John J. Cavanaugh Professor (emeritus) in Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies
Areas of Expertise: History of Astronomy and Physics, 1700-1900

Celia Deane-Drummond
Celia Deane-Drummond
Professor of Theology
Areas of Expertise: Science and religion; Systematic theology in relation to biological science, especially evolution, ecology, and genetics; Bioethics, especially sustainability, ecotheology, and public theology

Christopher Fox
Christopher Fox
Professor of English
Areas of Expertise: Interactions between literature and medicine; Psychology and science during the 18th century

Robert Goulding
Robert D. Goulding
Associate Professor, Program of Liberal Studies
Areas of Expertise: History of optics and history of magic; Humanism and science at the medieval and Renaissance universities

Gary Gutting
Gary Gutting
Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: Recent European Philosophy (especially French); Philosophy of Science/Epistemology; Philosophy of Religion

Christopher Hamlin
Christopher S. Hamlin
Professor of History
Areas of Expertise: History of technology; History of medicine

Don Howard
Don Howard
Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of Science; Foundations of Physics; History of Philosophy of Science; Ethics of Science and Technology


Lynn Joy
Lynn S. Joy
Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: History of Philosophy of Science, Modern Philosophy, and Ethics

Janet Kourany
Janet A. Kourany
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of science; Science and values; Feminist philosophy; Agnotology

Jay Malone
Jay Malone
Executive Director of The History of Science Society
Areas of Expertise: History of science; Autobiography in science; Science in colonial and early federal period of US; Science in the Old South

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A. Edward Manier
Professor of Philosophy (emeritus)
Areas of Expertise: History and philosophy of biology and the neuromedical sciences; Social studies of science

Kate Marshall
Kate Marshall
Assistant Professor of English
Areas of Expertise: Literature and science, especially 19th-21st century American literature; History of technology; Media studies

Vaughn McKim
Vaughn R. McKim
Associate Professor of Philosophy (emeritus)
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of social science; Philosophy of technology; Contemporary metaphysical issues in philosophy of science

Philip Mirowski
Philip E. Mirowski
Carl E. Koch Professor of Economics and Policy Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science
Areas of Expertise: History and philosophy of economic theory

James Nguyen
James Nguyen
HPS Postdoctoral Fellow
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of science and the question of scientific representation

Evan Ragland
Evan Ragland
Assistant Professor of History
Areas of Expertise: History of Science; History of Medicine; Early Modern Europe

kristin_shrader_frechette
Kristin Shrader-Frechette
O'Neill Family Professor of Philosophy and Concurrent Professor of Biological Sciences
Areas of Expertise: Scientific modeling; Methodological uncertainty; Statistical methods---especially in radiation physics and population biology; Quantitative human-health risk assessment; Normative ethics; Science and ethics

Philip Sloan
Philip R. Sloan
Emeritus Professor, Program of Liberal Studies
Areas of Expertise:History and Philosophy of Life Science, 1600–1990; Specialties: Buffon studies; evolution; Darwinism; science  and religion; recent biophysics; contemporary bioethics and philosophy

Thomas Stapleford
Thomas A. Stapleford
Associate Professor, Program of Liberal Studies
Areas of Expertise: History of the human sciences, especially economics and psychology; History of technology, science, and religion

Nicholas Teh
Nicholas Teh
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Areas of Expertise: Philosophy of Physics; Metaphysics; Philosophy of Science

Scott Trigg
Scott Trigg
HPS Postdoctoral Fellow
Areas of Expertise: History of astronomy and its interactions with other disciplines (natural philosophy, theology, optics); Education in Islamic societies; the Global Middle Ages; Narratives of medievalism and modernity

Laura Walls
Laura Dassow Walls
William P. and Hazel B. White Professor of English
Areas of Expertise: American Transcendentalism; Literature and Science

 

 

Logic and Philosophy of Math

The HPS program benefits from the strong Logic and Philosophy of Math Group housed in the Philosophy Department.

Faculty include Timothy Bays, Patricia Blanchette, Michael Detlefsen, and Curtis Franks, and activities include the Midwest PhilMath Workshop hosted annually at Notre Dame. For more information, please go to the Philosophy Department website.

Faculty Spotlights

Lynn S. Joy
Professor 
Department of Philosophy

Lynn Joy
Lynn S. Joy, Professor of Philosophy, has several areas of interest in her research and teaching.  She is currently writing a history of how theories of capacities and dispositions underwent a radical change when early modern scientists and philosophers found they could no longer defend Aristotelian accounts of causal powers and moral dispositions but yet still needed explanations that performed similar functions in their science and ethics. In her Dispositions and Intentionality in the Humean Tradition (in progress), she shows how Hume among others fashioned a striking compromise between dispositional explanations and regularity accounts of scientific laws.  This compromise had far-reaching consequences beyond science itself because it structured several central debates in what would eventually become the 20th-century Humean tradition in ethics and the philosophy of mind.

Prof. Joy is also currently teaching a new course on Women and Philosophy, which asks what roles a philosopher's own life and personal identity should play in defining and evaluating his or her philosophical achievements.  Do certain gender-related problems experienced by women philosophers today originate from mistaken beliefs about what constitutes a successful philosopher? 

Prof. Joy is the author of Gassendi the Atomist: Advocate of History in an Age of Science (1987/2002).  Her articles include: “The Ineliminability of Dispositions in Hume’s Rejection of Causal Powers,” in Powers and Capacities in Philosophy (2013); “Dispositional Explanations: Boyle’s Problem, Newton’s Solution, Hume’s Response,” in Interpreting Newton: Critical Essays (2012); “Scientific Explanation from Formal Causes to Laws of Nature,” in The Cambridge History of Science, Vol. 3 (2006).

James Turner
Cavanaugh Professor of Humanities Emeritus
Department of History

James Turner


Jim Turner's research focuses on American and modern British intellectual history. He is especially interested in the history of academic knowledge. His next book will examine the polymathic Scottish scholar William Robertson Smith (1846-1894), who started his career teaching physics, became a controversial Old Testament critic and Arabist, then went on to shape the modern disciplines of anthropology and comparative religion. Turner also studies the skies through a 280-mm modified Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope in his observatory in northern New Mexico. In 2014 Princeton University Press published his Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, a history of humanistic scholarship from Greek antiquity to the twentieth century. 

Robert (Jay) Malone
Executive Director, History of Science Society
Fellow, John J. Reilly Center

Jay Malone

Dr. Robert Jay Malone’s interests includes the history of science, autobiography in science, science in the colonial and early federal periods of US history as well as science in the Old South. His current book project is editing a 36-volume diary of Benjamin L. C. Wailes, a Mississippi planter who penned one of the U.S.’s earliest geological surveys.

Dr. Malone will be installed as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science at the AAAS's 2015 meeting. He has recently published a book chapter on William Bartram and William Dunbar,  “The Two Williams: Science and Connections in West Florida” in Fields of Vision (2010), and an encyclopedia piece on the "History of Science Society" in the Encyclopedia of the History of American Science, Medicine, and Technology (2014). 

Words in Action:
Science and Literature at Notre Dame

Laura Walls new photo


The Notre Dame HPS program is pleased to highlight our strength in science and literature. Our core group of faculty includes Laura Dassow Walls (pictured), Kate Marshall, Christopher Fox, John Sitter, Yasmin Solomonescu, and Matthew Wilkens. Click here to find out more about their award-winning research and publications.

 

Faculty Spotlight

Robert Goulding
Associate Professor
Program of Liberal Studies

Robert Goulding

 

Prof. Gouldings's interests include the history of optics, history of magic, and humanism and science at the medieval and Renaissance universities. His current book project is a study of the optical papers of Thomas Harriot, which he is researching and writing while on leave funded by the NEH and ACLS.

He is the author of Defending Hypatia: Ramus, Savile, and the Renaissance Rediscovery of Mathematical History (2010).

Click here to learn more.